The O’Kelly’s: Everything You Wanted To Know (2022 Stats)

The Ultimate Guide to O'Kelly's

Here's Everything You Wanted To Know

Joshua Smith

Joshua Smith

Founder and Editor at Cruising Freedom

This is the definitive guide to The O’Kelly’s for 2022.

Over the last 27 months, I have spent 82 hours watching and researching everything I could about S/V Clarity so you don’t have to.

(Unless, you know…you really want to. I won’t guilt-trip you!).

And yes, I really do love Nick and Megan’s funny side! 😃

If you wanted to know:

➔ How Nick and Megan afforded their 4th boat

➔ How they make their money while cruising

➔ What boat they have and its current upgrades

➔ How you can start crossing oceans just like them

Then you’ve definitely come to the right place.

Before we start, a quick introduction from me…

The Cruising Freedom Author

Ahoy, Matey! I’m Joshua from Australia. 🇦🇺

I’ve built the perfect business to sail the world.

A business model which can allow me to:

➔ Own a catamaran debt-free

➔ Go for weeks without WIFI

➔ Create semi-passive income

➔ Inspire others to dream big

But more on that later…. 🙂

The O'Kelly's FAQs (July 2022)

Boat Name

Clarity

Crew Members

Nick O’Kelly (age 48)

Megan O’Kelly (age 49)

The Boat

The O’Kelly’s from YouTube sail a 2009 Leopard 46 fitted out in the 4-cabin charter version. This is their first catamaran and they had owned 3 yachts previously.

Clarity has just been sold after being for sale for 4 weeks. They are in the market for a new boat.

Upgrades

To make Clarity capable of crossing oceans, Nick and Megan have outfitted her with:

➔ 9KW Northern Lights Genset

➔ 900AH of Relion lithium batteries

➔ 2400watts of solar panels (the highest I’ve seen)

➔ AIS Class B and Radar

➔ Spectra Newport 400 Watermaker

➔ Rocna 33kg Vulcan anchor (very popular)

➔ Spinnaker, Genoa and Code Zero

➔ Sewing room and salon

➔ Highfield RIB dingy with 30hp outboard

➔ Sat phone and new EPIRB

➔ 3 Cruiseair airconditioners (needs genset running)

Location

The O’Kelly’s are currently sailing in the United States, specifically, in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

They have been experiencing some medical issues:

Past Cruising

Onboard Clarity, The O’Kelly’s have explored in:

➔ The Bahamas

➔ Panama

➔ The South Pacific

➔ United States

Affording It

Nick and Megan don’t have kids and worked hard while saving/investing to make their dream happen. Their current boat cost them around $520,000.

Making Loot

In 2022, the O’Kelly’s make their money from:

➔ Stock market trading

➔ Nick’s audio books

➔ YouTube ad revenue

➔ 1-hour consulting calls

➔ Affiliate links to Squarespace & Amazon

➔ Their Patreon members

It’s estimated that the O’Kelly’s make $12,000 per month sailing and producing videos, bringing their net worth to $847,000 USD dollars.

Collaborations

The O’Kelly’s have not collaborated with any other cruising YouTube channels at this stage.

Big Moments

Some cool moments in The O’Kelly’s journey:

➔ Having a snake sliver onboard their catamaran

➔ Sailing very close to a hurricane with 40-knots

➔ Many comical videos about the reality of sailing

Future Plans

Once COVID-19 restrictions have ended, The O’Kelly’s are planning to sail the Coconut Milk Run.

This is the popular route from California to Australia which sees cruisers stop at many of the tropical islands along the way.

Key Takeaways

Things we can learn from Nick and Megan are:

➔ Buy the right boat for you and your needs

➔ Avoid crowded anchorages and tourist spots

➔ Stay fit cruising to avoid weight gains/injuries

➔ Do your research years before setting off

➔ Don’t take everything in life so seriously

Conclussion

Nick and Megan are an oddity in the sailing community with their humourous style. Their educational videos are extremely valuable and have inspired thousands of couples to plan their escape from the daily grind.

So with that, I hope you’re just as inspired by Nick and Megan as I am. They make the dream real.  👍

Creating Your Own Cruising Freedom

Hey! 😃 It’s Joshua again….

Clearly I’ve been very inspired by The O’Kelly’s and their travels…

Some say I’m obsessed, but sailing the world is my childhood dream.

They’re living the dream, but that dream isn’t actually that far away.

Earlier I mentioned about finding the perfect cruising business model.

With this exciting opportunity, I’ll be able to:

➔ Generate a sustainable $15,000/month with proof (yes, seriously!)

➔ Fund the purchase of my first sailing catamaran without any loans

➔ Do it without selling to friends & family (’cause that’s icky, am I right?!)

➔ Share my lifetime passion of sailing, cruising and global adventures

Curious to learn more? Jump on the free training right now. 🔥

The Sailing Family: All The SV Archer Facts (2022)

The Ultimate Guide to The Sailing Family

Here's Everything You Wanted To Know

Joshua Smith

Joshua Smith

Founder and Editor at Cruising Freedom

This is the definitive guide on The Sailing Family for 2022.

Over the last 24 months, I have spent 67 hours watching and researching everything I could about The Sailing Family so you don’t have to.

You should know that I really am *that* obsessed with Archer 😃

If you wanted to know:

➔ How Seth and Elizabeth afforded their boat

➔ How they make their money today

➔ What boat they have and its upgrades

➔ How you can start crossing oceans

Then you’ve definitely come to the right place.

Before we start, a quick introduction from me…

The Cruising Freedom Author

Ahoy, Matey! I’m Joshua from Australia. 🇦🇺

I’ve built the perfect business to sail the world.

A business model which can allow me to:

➔ Own a catamaran debt-free

➔ Go for weeks without WIFI

➔ Create semi-passive income

➔ Inspire others to dream big

But more on that later…. 🙂

The Sailing Family FAQs (July 2022)

Boat Name

S/V Archer

Crew Members

Seth Hynes, age 42

Elizabeth Hynes, age 41

Hale Hynes, age 10

Rhys Hynes, age 9

Pierce Hynes, age 7

The Boat

The Sailing Family’s boat is a 2014 Outremer 51′ in a 3-cabin owner’s version which is easily recognizable as it’s painted in ‘Ferrari’ red.

It was recently sold in Australia as Hull #32.

Previously they owned a smaller Lagoon 380 catamaran before they had children which they later found (12 years later) in Brisbane, Australia.

Upgrades

The Sailing Family have made very few changes to Archer, due primarily to the high-quality nature of Outremer’s catamarans.

The only upgrades are:

➔ Additional solar on the bimini (800w)

➔ 12 volt freezer to stay remote for longer

➔ Turned the starboard hull shower into a closet

Location

The Sailing Family from YouTube are still actively sailing with their 3 boys, and as of June 2022, have left Australia and returned to the United States.

They have not uploaded anything more to YouTube since January the 31st, 2022.

They are were cruising Australia’s east coast while awaiting COVID restrictions to ease.

Given their current location on Instagram, they appear to be about 3 months behind on their video production.

Past Cruising

The Sailing Family have taken Archer to:

➔ The South Pacific

➔ New Zealand

➔ Australia

➔ The United States

➔ The Panama Canal

➔ The Caribbean

Before the boys came, Seth and Elizabeth sailed their previous boat SV Honeymoon, a Lagoon 380, to The Caribbean and Europe.

In Australia, they went as far north as Lizard Island and as far south as Sydney.

Affording It

To buy Archer, Seth had worked in marketing and sales for some of the world’s most respected luxury brands.

Once they had kids, both Seth and Elizabeth save and sold all of their posessions. They then took out a boat loan for their catamaran on a low interest rate where the balance is secured against their retirement funds.

Making Loot

The Sailing Family makes money through:

➔ YouTube advertising revenue on every video

➔ Selling official Teespring merchandise

➔ Rental income from their investment property

➔ Vacay, Elizabeth’s new fashion business (on hold)

Collaborations

The Sailing Family have only collaborated with:

➔ Brett Vaughan’s SEAbbaticals by Multihull Central

Sailing Zatara in Fiji and Australia

Big Moments

The Sailing Family remarkable moments are:

➔ An accident causing hull damage due to a poor mooring ball breaking loose in Bora Bora

➔ Becoming caught up in New Zealand’s tough COVID-19 restrictions in April/May 2021

➔ A non-competitive race between Gunboat and Outremer (Spoiler alert: Gunboat won!)

➔ Losing control of their boat at nighttime and not being able to reduce their sail area

➔ Seth getting a significant face-wound due to body surfing with his friend, Luke, on the Sunshine Coast.

Future Plans

Now that SV Archer has been sold, where to next?

And why haven’t they uploaded anything for 3 months?

Seth is currently working with HH Catamarans as their new President.

Key Takeaways

There is much we can all learn from The Sailing Family:

➔ Sailing with kids is relatively easy

➔ A fast blue water boat is a safe boat

➔ Be wary of mooring balls in Bora Bora

➔ Couples need to work as a team

➔ Life is short, so make magic happen

Conclussion

The Sailing Family is the perfect example of making sacrifices to take children sailing around the world.

Creating Your Own Cruising Freedom

Hey! 😃 It’s Joshua again….

Clearly I’ve been very inspired by The Sailing Family and their travels…

Some say I’m obsessed, but sailing the world is my childhood dream.

They’re living the dream, but that dream isn’t actually that far away.

Earlier I mentioned about finding the perfect cruising business model.

With this exciting opportunity, I’ll be able to:

➔ Generate a sustainable $15,000/month with proof (yes, seriously!)

➔ Fund the purchase of my first sailing catamaran without any loans

➔ Do it without selling to friends & family (’cause that’s icky, am I right?!)

➔ Share my lifetime passion of sailing, cruising and global adventures

Curious to learn more? Read more about the free training right now. 🔥

Sailing Nahao: Everything You Wanted To Know (May 2022)

The Ultimate Guide to Sailing Nahao

Here's Everything You Wanted To Know

Joshua Smith

Joshua Smith

Founder and Editor at Cruising Freedom

This is the definitive guide on Sailing Nahao for 2022.

Over the last 18 months, I have spent 75 hours watching and researching everything I could about Sailing Nahao so you don’t have to.

Because I really am *that* obsessed with Ben and Ashley! 😃

If you wanted to know:

➔ How Ben and Ashley afforded their boat

➔ How they make their money today

➔ What boat they have and its upgrades

➔ How you can start crossing oceans

Then you’ve definitely come to the right place.

Many consider this site to be the Wikipedia of the YouTube cruising community.

Before we start, a quick introduction from me…

The Cruising Freedom Author

Ahoy, Matey! I’m Joshua from Australia. 🇦🇺

I’ve built the perfect business to sail the world.

A business model which can allow me to:

➔ Own a catamaran debt-free

➔ Go for weeks without WIFI

➔ Create semi-passive income

➔ Inspire others to dream big

But more on that later…. 🙂

Sailing Nahao FAQs (July 2022)

Boat Name

Sailing Nahao, previously named Marheva.

Crew Members

Ben Stobbart (age 39)

Ashley Stobbart (age 41)

Willa Stobbart (age 2)

Their son Bodhi Stobbart was born in November 2021.

The Boat

Nahao is a 2005 Lagoon 410.

This often isn’t consider a blue water cruising catamaran as it’s best for the charter market.

And yet, Ben and Ashley have made it work for their cruising adventures.

Upgrades

Nahao has had many upgrades:

➔ A Code Zero and Main Sail

➔ 1200w of solar panels + D400 mount

➔ 3000W Victron inverter

➔ Iridium Go + Antenna

➔ Badelf GPS puck + iPad for navigation

➔ New Dacron Sailbag which Ashley made herself

➔ New Hardtop custom-made by Just Catamarans

➔ 10ft Inflatable Dingy with 15hp outboard

Location

As of recently, Sailing Nahao are anchored in the Maldives.

Past Cruising

Nahao has been sailed extensively to:

➔ North America

➔ Venezuela

➔ The Panama Canal

➔ Columbia

➔ The South Pacific (Coconut Milk Run)

➔ New Zealand

➔ Papua New Guinea

➔ Indonesia

Affording It

After the loss of Ashley’s father, Ben and Ashley worked hard, invested and sacrified much for 7 years to afford their catamaran. The boat cost approximately $320,000 and required additional work to be cruiser-ready.

Making Loot

In 2022, Sailing Nahao makes their money with:

➔ YouTube advertising revenue

➔ Affiliate links on their website

➔ Ben works daily on his startup

➔ Selling sailing fan merchandise

➔ Brand sponsorship with Precision Sail Loft, OceanRodeo, Steiner Optics and Brnkl

It’s estimated that their combined income averages $10,000/month with a total net worth of $730,000.

Collaborations

Sailing Nahao hasn’t collaborated with any YouTube channels, however, they have a close connection with Sailing Zatara.

Big Moments

Sailing Nahao’s remarkable moments in cruising:

➔ A video on defending against pirate attacks

➔ Catching some seriously big fish while sailing

➔ Coming across a sinking catamaran on an Atoll

➔ Assisting with an amazing boat build in Indonesia

➔ Crashing into a rock after 4 years of cruising

➔ Being approached at sea while cruising

➔ Almost getting arrested in the Maldives

Future Plans

Sailing Nahao have become quieter on their YouTube channel since the arrival of Willa. They have done shorter coastal cruising trips.

Due to Bodhi’s recent birth, the family had temporarily stopped sailing and filming, instead re-publishing older content plus life updates.

Now they’re in the Maldives and we’re not so sure where they’re off to next.

Key Takeaways

There is much we can learn from Ben and Ashley:

➔ Living on a catamaran is normal

➔ You can cruise and work remotely

➔ A production catamaran is still fine

➔ Affording a boat requires some sacrifice

➔ Work hard so you can live your dreams

Conclussion

In the wise words of Ben and Ashley: Never grow up.

We look forward to seeing their adventure continue with their two children too. This would be the ultimate #worldschooling experience.

Creating Your Own Cruising Freedom

Hey! 😃 It’s Joshua again….

Clearly I’ve been very inspired by Ben, Ashley and their travels…

Some say I’m obsessed, but sailing the world is my childhood dream.

Nahao is living the dream, but that dream isn’t actually that far away.

Earlier I mentioned about finding the perfect cruising business model.

With this exciting opportunity, I’ll be able to:

➔ Generate a sustainable $15,000/month with proof (yes, seriously!)

➔ Fund the purchase of my first sailing catamaran without any loans

➔ Do it without selling to friends & family (’cause that’s icky, am I right?!)

➔ Share my lifetime passion of sailing, cruising and global adventures

Curious to learn more? Jump on the free training right now. 🔥

SV Delos: Discover The Crew’s Secrets and Net Worth (2022)

The Ultimate Guide to SV Delos

Here's Everything You Wanted To Know

Joshua Smith

Joshua Smith

Founder and Editor at Cruising Freedom

This is the definitive guide on SV Delos for 2022.

Since 2015, I have spent 207 hours watching and researching everything I could about SV Delos so you don’t have to.

(Indeed, I really am *that* obsessed with Brian, Karin and their expanding crew 😃)

If you wanted to know:

➔ How Brian and Karin afforded their boat

➔ How they make their money today

➔ What boat they have and its upgrades

➔ How you can start crossing oceans

Then you’ve definitely come to the right place.

Before we start, a quick introduction from me…

The Cruising Freedom Author

Ahoy, Matey! I’m Joshua from Australia. 🇦🇺

I’ve built the perfect business to sail the world.

A business model which can allow me to:

➔ Own a catamaran debt-free

➔ Go for weeks without WIFI

➔ Create semi-passive income

➔ Inspire others to dream big

But more on that later…. 🙂

SV Delos FAQs (July 2022)

Boat Name

SV Delos

Crew Members

Brian Trautman (age 45)

Karin Syren (age 37)

Sierra Trautman (age 1)

Brady Trautman (age 38)

Alex Blue (age 37)

Lisa Hopf (age 34)

Elizabeth Earle (age 34)

Taylor Francis (age 27) entered Delos on Episode 327 but left in Episode 350. Some of you may recall Taylor as she was very popular on Sailing Doodles in years prior.

She runs her own channel called Taylor’s Travels.

The Boat

SV Delos is a 2000 53′ Amel Super Maramu built in La Rochelle, France. Brian was the 2nd owner and paid roughly $375,000 USD in 2009.

Upgrades

Brian Trauntman has done many upgrades to SV Delos over the years, notibly:

➔ Washer and dryer combo

➔ Dishwasher

➔ Onan 8KW Generator

➔ A lithium battery bank to power induction cooktops, thereby completely removing propane

➔ Viasat internet router (on trial)

Location

SV Delos are in the San Blas Islands, Panama, as of the 3rd of June, 2022. This is noted in Episode 369.

Past Cruising

SV Delos have sailed extensively over the past 11 years to the following destinations:

➔ The Pacific sailing the famous ‘Coconut Milk Run’

➔ Australia, sailing the east coast and Cocos Keeling

➔ Thailand, Indonesia and the Philippines

➔ West Coast of Africa (to avoid Somalian pirates)

➔ India, Sri Lanka and the Andaman Islands

➔ South America including several countries

➔ The United States, Brian’s original departure

They recently flew to Sweden to visit family, making it one of their first flights in a very long time.

Affording It

Brian spent several years working as a computer programmer and saved/invested aggressively. In addition, he purchased SV Delos before the Global Financial Crisis where he was able to take on a boat loan at low interest rates.

From there, Brian, his first wife Erin and his brother Brady sailed from Washington all the way to New Zealand, where Erin and Brian divorced in 2010. She then departed back to the United States (taking Mishka their beloved cat back too), while SV Delos remained motionless in Australia for a year.

Erin Trautman since remarried, now known as Erin Russ and today has an 7-year old son and still sails.

Update: Erin is actually writing a book about her experiences on Delos. If you’re looking to find out more about the early days sailing from the United States to Australia, then it should be ready in 2022.

Making Loot

As of June 2022, SV Delos net worth is estimated to be $980,000 USD before taxes.

This includes the value of the boat, their belongings (camera gear), business income and personal savings.

In the early days, Brian worked remotely for his company part-time while the remainder of his crew took on normal jobs for the next sailing season.

Today, Brian and his crew make $17,500/month via:

➔ YouTube advertising revenue

➔ Affiliate links under their videos

➔ Their thousands of Patreons

➔ Selling SV Delos merchandise

➔ Links to life insurance quotes

Interestingly, SV Delos has no corporate sponsors making their content very unbiased. 🙂

Brian still does some programming and consulting, while Brady’s entire income stream is dependent on their YouTube channel.

Collaborations

SV Delos has collaborated with these YouTubers:

➔ The infamous Captain Fatty Goodlander

Chasing Bubbles

➔ SV Totem

Distant Shores TV

➔ Bamba Maru

Captain Rick Moore

Sailing Parlay Revival

Sailing Into Freedom (the lengendary Plukky!)

Most recently, they did a collaboration with Sailing Doodles

The entire sailing community is still awaiting a collaboration with Sailing La Vagabonde.

However, former Delos crew member Josje Leyton did spend a few weeks on Riley and Elayna’s boat a few years ago.

She has moved on and today goes by the name Josje Maxime but has been offline since April 2021.

Josje now lives in NZ and wishes to be left alone.

Big Moments

Remarkable moments in SV Delos history are:

➔ An attempted roberry in Episode 127

➔ Catching a thief in Madagascar

➔ Being circled by the US Coastguard

➔ Sailing in a 50-knot gale force storm

➔ Pulling a drunken sailor off the reef

➔ Multiple ocean crossings (Indian/Pacific/Equator)

➔ Cave diving and shark swimming with Sierra

➔ Getting kicked out in San Blas Islands

➔ Hitting reefs (making them true sailors!)

Future Plans

SV Delos plans to relax and do some easy kid-friendly sailing in South America and the United States.

They aren’t planning on buying a new boat in 2022, but if they did, it’s likely their next boat will be an Amel 60 with a 3-cabin layout.

Key Takeaways

SV Delos are the sailing gods of YouTube which remind us everyday that:

➔ Our world is a remarkably safe place

➔ Sailing around isn’t that expensive

➔ Our lives are an evolving journey

➔ We’re much closer than we think

➔ It might be time to let go of the baggage

Conclussion

SV Delos is an unbiased and raw look at the world of sustainable global cruising which appeals to the sailing community.

They’ve inspired many to change pathways and make every moment count, including myself. ✌️

Creating Your Own Cruising Freedom

Hey! 😃 It’s Joshua again….

Clearly I’ve been very inspired by SV Delos and their travels…

I’ve been watching for a very long time after all.

Some say I’m obsessed, but sailing the world is my childhood dream.

They’re living the dream, but that dream isn’t actually that far away.

Earlier I mentioned about finding the perfect cruising business model.

With this exciting opportunity, I’ll be able to:

➔ Generate an income while working 100% remotely from the laptop

➔ Fund the purchase of my first sailing catamaran without any loans

➔ Do it without selling to friends & family (’cause that’s icky, am I right?!)

➔ Share my lifetime passion of sailing, cruising and global adventures

Curious to learn more? Jump on the free training right now. 🔥

9 Best Marinas for Liveaboards on the Gold Coast

Move over #vanlife, ’cause given the rise of sailing channels like Sailing La Vagabonde over the years, #boatlife is here to stay. As a result, thousands of people are on YachtHub daily looking at the cost of a boat.

As an Australian, there is no greater place to become a liveaboard than the Gold Coast. Balmy summer days and mild waters make it the perfect spot, and it’s little wonder why I lived there for 4 years right across from the Southport Yacht Club.

I recently did some research to find some marinas on the Gold Coast that allow liveaboards, either short-term or long-term. And while you can stay on an anchorage for 7 days, sometimes you might want to stay longer to ride out an approaching storm front, restock your boat or do some necessary repairs. Or work directly from your boat!

Either way, I’ve got you covered. Here are 9 highly recommended liveaboard marinas on the Gold Coast:

1. Mariner’s Cove Marina (Main Beach)

My #1 best pick is always Mariner’s Cove Marina. Its location means you’ll have access to grocery stores, boutiques and public transport links. If you fancy catching some waves in the morning, then Main Beach and Narrowneck serves up an incredible 2-foot to 5-foot swell in the winter months.

2. Southport Yacht Club

Right next door to Mariner’s Cove is the Southport Yacht Club. Often it’s less likely that you’ll find an available berth here but alas, still worth a mention given the central location. There is nothing better than having lunch here on a weekday and catching up with the locals who all have one too many stories to tell.

3. Runaway Bay Marina (Hollywell)

The Runaway Bay Marina is still quite central and a place to spot some of the nicest waterfront homes around the Gold Coast. It can get a little crowded here so it’s worth calling up in advance to check if any of the 196 marine berths are available for temporary bookings. This is one popular spot for cruising catamarans and yachts coming in from Fiji and the rest of the South Pacific.

4. Gold Coast City Marina & Shipyard

If you need some serious work done to your hull, engines or batteries, then you need to get it over to the Gold Coast City Marina and Shipyard. This place is huge! Aesthetically-speaking, it isn’t the best given it’s a full-service boat-works area just like The Boat Works mentioned below, but well worth checking out regardless.

5. Calypso Bay Marina

The latest marina to open on the Gold Coast is Calypso Bay who allows liveaboards for short-term occupancy. The area is stunning and quite a distance away from the party boats and tourists of the Gold Coast. The area is still in development but you can see some real money here with the beautiful waterfront homes and upmarket dining options.

6. Tweed Marina

Fancy heading south? Across the border and into New South Wales, you’ll find Tweed Marina. They allow liveaboard cruisers for the short-term and this is the only marina you’ll find until you get down to Brunswick Heads. That said – you won’t want to leave with just how peaceful it is here at Tweed Heads with its numerous cafes and vibrant waterways worth exploring. No jet skis here and rarely do you find powerboats too!

7. Hope Island and Hope Harbour Marinas

There are two marinas here. You’ve got Hope Island Marina and Hope Harbour Marina which both allow liveaboard cruising couples needing a save haven for a little while. You can stay here year-round except for April and May where the Sanctuary Cove International Boat Show comes to town.

8. The Boat Works

The Boat Works is a highly recommended place to find quality marine mechanics and upholstery experts, as well as staying in the marina. The place is quite busy and no doubt you’ll spot a few large superyachts as well. Based on Coomera, their claim is “Australia’s greatest boatyard” and I certainly would agree. Plenty of marine trades here and world-class facilities, though not always the best place to enjoy the serenity.

9. Bayview Harbour

A top spot to enjoy the quieter side of the Gold Coast is Bayview Harbour. This happens to be one of the oldest and most established marinas on the Gold Coast and you can certainly stay here as a liveaboard. Unfortunately, apart from some local cafes, there isn’t much shopping or much else to do here, so it’s really for the short-stay liveaboards.

Getting Started

And I’m done! That’s 9 great marinas worth checking into if you live aboard your boat. Of course, you’re unlikely to stay long term (several years) in these locations but you can certainly stay short-term. To get around some of the rules, you can always head off to one of the Gold Coast anchorages for a few days and then return, or head off to another one of these beautiful marinas!

Sailing La Vagabonde: Discover Riley and Elayna’s Secrets (2022)

The Ultimate Guide to Sailing La Vagabonde

Here's Everything You Wanted To Know

Joshua Smith

Joshua Smith

Founder and Editor at Cruising Freedom

This is the definitive guide to Sailing La Vagabonde for 2022.

Over the last 6 years, my Youtube stats tell me that I have spent 172 hours watching and researching everything I could about La Vagabonde so you don’t have to.

(Yes, I really am *that* obsessed with Riley and Elayna’s journey 😃 I’ve honestly watched EVERY episode to date!)

If you wanted to know:

➔ How Sailing La Vagabonde afforded their boat

➔ How they make their money today

➔ What boat they have and its upgrades

➔ How you can start crossing oceans

Then you’ve definitely come to the right place.

Think of this like a wiki for Sailing La Vagabonde.

Before we start, a quick introduction from me…

The Cruising Freedom Author

Ahoy, Matey! I’m Joshua from Australia. 🇦🇺

I’ve built the perfect business to sail the world.

A business model which can allow me to:

➔ Own a catamaran debt-free

➔ Go for weeks without WIFI

➔ Create semi-passive income

➔ Inspire others to dream big

But more on that later…. 🙂

Sailing La Vagabonde FAQs (July 2022)

Boat Name

La Vagabonde

Crew Members

Riley Whitelum (age 36) from Kimba, South Australia.

Elayna Carausu (age 32) from Perth, Western Australia.

Lenny Whitelum (age 3) who is now actively talking and swimming all by himself.

Elayna gave birth to their 2nd child, Darwin, in 2021, who is now almost 1 year old and almost walking.

Riley and Elayna are NOT married, nor has Riley ever proposed to Elayna. They remain in a de facto relationship.

The Boat

Sailing La Vagabonde’s current catamaran is a 2017 Outremer 45 with an owner’s cabin in the starboard hull.

Previously they owned a monohull which was a 2007 Beneteau Cyclades 43. This is the original ‘La Vagabonde’, a yacht that was designed for the charter market without a dedicated owner’s cabin.

Their 3rd boat will be a Rapido Trimaran 60. This is designed for serious performance and sailing beyond the wind speed.

Some say this boat isn’t ideal for family cruising with very young children, and I tend to agree.

Update: They have actually decided NOT to sell their catamaran as per their latest video:

In short: They’re creating Vagabonde Adventures which will become a boat charter company where you can learn to sail on their very own catamaran.

Their friend Jack, a sailing instructor, will run the business so Riley and Elayna can continue sailing as a family.

More info at: VagabondeAdventures.com

A very wise choice I must say! They will still buy the Rapido 60 for themselves.

Upgrades

Before taking ownership, Outremer had spec’d the 45 at the factory in France with:

➔ Code D and Code Zero lightwind sails (the code D is Elayna’s favorite sail)

➔ Two upright 12v fridges in the galley

➔ Retractable daggerboards (a rather expensive optional upgrade, yet highly recommended)

➔ Twin 215hp diesel inboard motors

Meanwhile, Riley and Elayna have added:

➔ Fortress Spade Anchor (they use it as a spare)

➔ 560watts of solar panels on the bimini

➔ Dessalator Freedom Cruise Water Maker

➔ Watt And Sea Hydro Generator

➔ Inflatable tender called Cunningham II with 15hp Honda outboard. Their first tender mysteriously disappeared 5 years ago as it was being towed while sailing. (Whoops!)

Location

Sailing La Vagabonde returned to Australia in 2021 despite border closures and travel restrictions.

After all, their son Darwin was just born.

Their current location is Cuba (the Ragged Islands) reflected on both their YouTube and Instagram accounts but they are heading towards the Bahamas.

This shows they are currently up to date on video production.

Past Cruising

Riley and Elayna have sailed extensively to:

➔ The Mediterranean

➔ The Bahamas

➔ United States of America

➔ The Azores

➔ Cape Verde

➔ Antigua

➔ Australia (Riley sailed as a crew of a racing team)

➔ Dominica

➔ Grenada

➔ British Virgin Islands

➔ St Lucia

➔ Venezuela

➔ Panama Canal

➔ French Polynesia

➔ Tonga

➔ New Zealand (friends boat)

➔ Mallorca

➔ Morocco

➔ Gibraltar

Affording It

Riley worked for 4 years in the mining industry in South Australia and saved $100,000, earning *just* enough to purchase his monohull before meeting Elayna.

The purchase of La Vagabonde II, however, didn’t not require spending $1,200,000 USD (the retail price of La Vagabonde’s Outremer 45), and instead, was based off their audience size and Outremer’s potential for marketing reach similar to a sponsorship deal.

(And if you’re wondering, I’ll be buying either a Seawind or an Outremer)

The La Vagabonde II catamaran itself, just like the original monohull, is legally owned by Riley and Elayna.

Outremer assisted with the loan on the catamaran, however, Outremer did NOT give a free boat to Riley and Elayna. This is the biggest false rumour on the internet which continues to haunt the couple.

Making Loot

In 2022, Sailing La Vagabonde makes money through:

➔ YouTube advertising revenue

➔ Amazon affiliate links

➔ Official La Vagabonde merch

➔ Elayna’s songs and CDs

➔ Their thousands of Patreons

➔ Brand sponsorship with Audible

With multiple streams of income, this brings the estimated net worth of Sailing La Vagabonde to $1,700,000 and they possibly could purchase their next boat, a Rapido Trimaran 60, for cash.

However, this is likely a sponsorship deal similar to Outremer’s previous offer.

It’s estimated that Riley and Elayna make $27,000 per month in US dollars, or $8,200 per episode published. However, earning that much money requires 30 to 50 hours of editing to publish one polished YouTube video.

Elayna recently created Vaga Bella Swim™︎ – a 100% recycled swimwear company which is definitely worth checking out.

Collaborations

Sailing La Vagabonde has collaborated with the following YouTubers:

➔ Adam Stern from Free Diving Family who held the Australian record for freediving

➔ Yosha, a previous crewmate of SV Delos, also stayed on board several years ago

Eamon & Bec who usually do Van Life.

Lost Leblanc who is a very popular travel vlogger

After all these years, we’re still waiting for a collaboration with SV Delos. 😃

Big Moments

Memorable moments in the Sailing La Vagabonde journey include:

➔ Being chased by a powerboat late at night during a potential pirate attack. This was on the original Beneteau. While Elayna hid in the aft cabin, Riley avoided the attack by throwing cans of tin food. Surprisingly (and fortunately) the strategy worked.

➔ Lenny having stopped breathing and being rushed to hospital.

➔ Sailing 22 knots in high winds without putting a reef in the main, causing Elayna to panic and the YouTube community to voice their concerns.

➔ Sailing Greta Thunberg across the North Atlantic with Lenny in tow.

➔ Freediving in the deepest hole in the world where Adam was featured.

In recent episodes, both Riley and Elayna have really struggled to manage 2 young children AND all the work that’s necessary on a boat.

Future Plans

With their Outremer 45 being listed for sale, Riley and Elayna are now working on building their 3rd boat, a Rapido 60, announced in June, 2021. It should be ready in a few months.

Interestingly, despite the growing family, they have chosen a boat with orientation for speed over comfort.

As mentioned previously, I disagree that this is the right boat for their growing family and many within the cruising community agree with my stance.

Key Takeaways

We can learn from Riley and Elayna that:

➔ Cruising isn’t always moonshine and sunsets

➔ Men and women play an equal role on board

➔ Much of the world is actually a safe place

➔ Raising children on sailboards is trending

➔ Always speak the truth, even when it’s hard

➔ You only live once, so make life happen

Conclussion

Riley and Elayna are the epitome of the authentic yet polished influencers of the sailing world. Some would say modern-day sea-gypsies.

They even have their own Subreddit!

We see Riley and Elayna’s epic lifestyle today but we don’t see the consistent work over multiple years prior.

Getting here and finally living #boatlife certainly wasn’t an easy process, but through their commitment, but we can clearly see it’s been well worth it.

Creating Your Own Cruising Freedom

Hey! 😃 It’s Joshua again….

Clearly I’ve been very inspired by Sailing La Vagabonde and their travels…

Some say I’m obsessed, but sailing the world is my childhood dream.

They’re living the dream, but that dream isn’t hard to achieve today.

Earlier I mentioned about finding the perfect cruising business model.

With this exciting opportunity, I’ll be able to:

➔ Generate a sustainable full-time income remotely (yes, seriously!)

➔ Fund the purchase of my first sailing catamaran without any loans

➔ Do it without selling to friends & family (’cause that’s icky, am I right?!)

➔ Share my lifetime passion for sailing, cruising and global adventures

Curious to learn more? Jump on the free training right now. 🔥

Sailing Ruby Rose: Learn More About Nick and Terysa (2022)

The Ultimate Guide to Sailing Ruby Rose

Here's Everything You Wanted To Know

Joshua Smith

Joshua Smith

Founder and Editor at Cruising Freedom

This is the definitive guide on Sailing Ruby Rose for 2022.

Over the last 18 months, I have spent 75 hours watching and researching everything I could about Sailing Ruby Rose so you don’t have to.

(Yes, I really am *that* obsessed with Nick and Terysa 😃)

If you wanted to know:

➔ How Nick and Terysa afforded their boat

➔ How they make their money today

➔ What boat they have and its upgrades

➔ How you can start crossing oceans

Then you’ve definitely come to the right place.

Before we start, a quick introduction from me…

The Cruising Freedom Author

Ahoy, Matey! I’m Joshua from Australia. 🇦🇺

I’ve built the perfect business to sail the world.

A business model which can allow me to:

➔ Own a catamaran debt-free

➔ Go for weeks without WIFI

➔ Create semi-passive income

➔ Inspire others to dream big

But more on that later…. 🙂

Sailing Ruby Rose FAQs (July 2022)

Boat Name

Ruby Rose (previously) flying a London flag, and Ruby Rose 2 (future).

They were currently leasing a Seawind 1260 in Australia but this ended several months ago.

Crew Members

Nick Fabbri (49) and Terysa Vanderloo (34) who, after dating for almost 10 years, are neither engaged nor married. They have mostly cruised by themselves.

Terysa is originally from Adelaide, just like myself.

The Boat

Sailing Ruby Rose previously owned a Southerly 38 monohull which they had owned for 7+ years and sailed 20,000 nautical miles. Nick and Terysa ordered a Seawind 1370 in mid 2020, and this catamaran will be the first of the 1370 series off the production line.

Upgrades

Nick and Terysa made many upgrades to their first sail boat:

➔ Cockpit enclosure (Nick made this himself)

➔ Code Zero, Parasailor and Storm Jib.

➔ Custom marine mattresses for the aft cabin

➔ Solar, wind and hydro power upgrades

➔ Coffee Machine (yes, really…!)

➔ Apple TV, Television and Blu-Ray Player

Location

According to Instagram and YouTube, they are in Saigon, Vietnam at the Seawind factory. They are visiting the factory and doing some work on their new boat.

This shows that they’re up to date on their videos.

This is one of their most recent videos:

Past Cruising

Nick and Terysa have sailed in the following regions:

➔ Bermuda

➔ Bahamas

➔ British Virgin Islands (BVI)

➔ Canary Islands

➔ England (Nick’s original home)

➔ France (including the canals)

➔ Morocco

➔ Portugal

➔ Peurto Rico

➔ Spain

➔ US Virgin Islands

➔ Caribbean

➔ United States of America

➔ Australia

Affording It

Nick worked as a dentist with his own practice in England, while Terysa worked as a paramedic in her original hometown of Adelaide, Australia. The couple met more than 10 years ago on a group tour in India and began dating soon afterwards.

Between personal savings and the sale of Nick’s dentistry practice, the couple was able to afford their first boat, the Southerly 38. At the time, it was almost 2x their initial budget but provided them an excellent base in which to do ocean crossings.

Making Loot

In 2022, Sailing Ruby Rose makes their money with:

➔ YouTube advertising revenue

➔ Affiliate links on YouTube videos

➔ Merchandise on their website

➔ Their hundreds of Patreon members

➔ Brand sponsorships (while remaining unbiased)

Collaborations

Sailing Ruby Rose have collaborated with the following YouTubers:

Gone With The Wynns (5x episodes)

Distant Shores TV

Sailing Uma

Big Moments

➔ The worst moments for Sailing Ruby Rose are the numerous melt downs between Nick and Terysa

➔ The best moments are boat reviews and unbiased feedback with viewer scoring system

➔ Their most popular video is ‘How Much Does It Cost To Sail Around The World?’ and we have an excellent guide here.

Future Plans

Sailing Ruby Rose will transform into Sailing Ruby Rose II with a Seawind 1370. They plan on exploring Australia, and after COVID-19 is a distant memory, will explore Asia and beyond.

Key Takeaways

Nick and Terysa are the epidome of young and free while staying true to their values. Their engaging audiences sees the raw vulnerability and honest glimpse of #boatlife for budget-conscious cruisers.

They didn’t wait for the million-dollar catamaran and instead, used the resources which were available to them at the time.

They also remind us that boats at boatshows aren’t a true representation of what a boat can and can’t handle.

Conclussion

I expect Sailing Ruby Rose to continue their sailing travels for at least the next 3 to 5 years. You can bet I’ll be tuned in until the end!

Creating Your Own Cruising Freedom

Hey! 😃 It’s Joshua again….

Clearly I’ve been very inspired by Sailing Ruby Rose and their travels…

Some say I’m obsessed, but sailing the world is my childhood dream.

They’re living the dream, but that dream isn’t actually that far away.

Earlier I mentioned about finding the perfect cruising business model.

With this exciting opportunity, I’ll be able to:

➔ Generate a sustainable $15,000/month with proof (yes, seriously!)

➔ Fund the purchase of my first sailing catamaran without any loans

➔ Do it without selling to friends & family (’cause that’s icky, am I right?!)

➔ Share my lifetime passion of sailing, cruising and global adventures

Curious to learn more? Jump on the free training right now. 🔥

How Long Does It Take to Sail Across The Pacific?

Doing a pacific crossing on a monohull or catamaran is one experience you’ll cherish for years, but one that requires a ton of prior planning.

Crossing the Pacific – Sail Times

With more than 8,000 nautical miles to sail, it takes 2.5 to 4 weeks to make the longest leg of a Pacific crossing from Galapagos Islands to The Marquesas. However, most cruisers take 3 to 6 months, or even up to 12 months, to do the entire ‘Coconut Milk Run’ from Panama to Australia, by stopping into many atolls, islands and countries along the way.

Sailing across the Pacific can be done easily in both a multihull and a monohull.

Fortunately, this long crossing typically has favourable currents and strong tradewinds, allowing both a fast and comfortable passage with many cruisers referring this to being relatively easy sailing. Mild swell, predictable and clean winds and with next to no squalls, it’s a trip that’s well within your means, and yes, even if it’s your first large crossing.

That is – provided you do some strong planning, good provisioning and have more than 2 crew members. We certainly wouldn’t recommend an Atlantic crossing for a couple unless you’ve got some serious sea miles under your belt, otherwise, you’ll arrive into French Polynesia completely and utterly exhausted.

In this guide, we’ll help you better plan the trip so you can have a safe and comfortable voyage, and you’ll see why the South Pacific especially is one of the best cruising grounds out there.

West-Bound vs East-Bound

In many cases, it’s far better to head east-bound (towards Australia) as opposed to sailing towards the Panama Canal. This is because you’ll be sailing upwind with both tides and wind working against the boat.

Not only will the ride be more uncomfortable, but you’ll be putting more stress and strain on your boat at the same time. Many cruisers like us are out there to have fun and aren’t fond of an unpleasant crossing.

Length of Voyage

As we hinted at the start, you shouldn’t focus on the length of the crossing but plan for an entire year (or 3!) to do a Pacific crossing. This is because of the epic islands, unique cultures, incredible anchorages and stunning mounts (hello Marquesas!) that you’ll find along the way.

Unlike the Mediterranean, there are thousands of protected anchorages along the way paired with many available buoys (often times free) to protect the sensitive coral reefs. When you’re cruising, who’s in a rush? Especially when it’s the trip of a lifetime for many aspiring sailors.

Route Planning

A truly first-world problem is choosing which route you’d want to take on your first Pacific crossing, and there is no one-route-fits-all approach here. It really comes down to your boat type, crew numbers, vessel weight, time of year and current experience.

We would highly recommend stopping into the Galapagos Islands and stay for 2 to 3 weeks. Quarantine here is quite strict so you’ll have to consume or dispose of any food before entering port while ensuring you arrive on a spotless hull.

A drawback towards any Pacific crossing is experiencing the doldrums. This challenge is mostly felt after leaving the Galapagos Islands en route to French Polynesia, but then again…where else would you rather be?

For the following islands, their order is based on heading eastwards on a Pacific Crossing.

French Polynesia

If time permits, we would recommend 1 to 2 months in French Polynesia if you really want to experience the culture shock and the incredible hospitality. This country is the epitome of world cruising and ‘living the dream’ with the many atolls and empty beaches where few tourists ever visit.

For those of you rushing the trip, then you can’t leave without stopping into Taumotus and The Marquesas for their incredible mountains and lush rainforests. As an added bonus, the frequent rainfalls means that you’ll be able to get that salt off your deck too!

Tahiti

If you’re anything like us, Tahiti has been at the top of your bucket list for years. It sits almost smack-bang in the middle of Australia and the United States meaning it’s both difficult and expensive for every day tourists to explore. The benefit(s) of owning a sailing vessel after all, right?

Tahiti is a part of the Society Islands and is the most popular island for cruisers. It’s certainly worth a stopover to rest, recover and restock your boat with fresh provisions.

Tonga

One of the most beautiful things about Tonga is the short hops between its 3 main anchorages. This makes for a welcome reprieve after the Pacific crossing, paired with incredible hospitality.

Unfortunately, this is also where you’ll start seeing commercial tourism at play given the daily flights between Tonga and Australia. So if you’re missing modern civilization, just remember “Things get normal again from Tonga onwards”

Fiji

Things really start to get normal from Fiji onwards with resorts, hotels and restaurants never too far away from Suva. Fortunately, Fiji is a huge cruising ground and you could spend several months here without seeing the whole lot.

While snorkeling, fishing and diving can be found in many Pacific islands, Fiji is also where you’ll find some epic places to go surfing, kite boarding and even pick up some half-decent WIFI to catch up on social media back home. Like we said….you’re almost back to normality here.

Vanuatu

Vanuatu isn’t as busy as Fiji (fortunately!) and makes for a great stopover before you do your final stretch of sailing across the pacific. We fell in love with the amazing scenery both above and below the waterline.

The local people are warm and friendly while the local festivals can’t to be missed. Some say it’s the happiest country in the world, and we certainly couldn’t disagree! It’s at this point that you’ll start to feel some angst as the end of your trip is looming.

Finishing a Pacific Crossing in Australia or New Zealand?

For many who are finishing off their Pacific crossing, it’s hard to know whether to make a bee-line for Australia and enter in Brisbane, Coffs Harbour or Sydney, or make a diversion to Auckland. This depends on what time of year you’re making the Pacific crossing.

In late autumn through to mid Summer, it’s a perfect time to check into Auckland and explore the incredible cruising grounds of New Zealand’s North Island. However, the region is very cold in the winter months paired with less predictable weather systems making a leap to Australia more challenging for a novice sailor.

So in short, aim for Auckland if you can make it, otherwise sail direct to Australia’s east coast. Sydney to Brisbane can be cruised year-round with no cyclone seasons making a perfect base in which to explore, and later head for Auckland as summer approaches once again.

17 Beautiful Boating Anchorages in Sydney

Sydney ranks very high on our list of beautiful places to explore with a yacht or catamaran. It’s no surprise really given its incredible year-round temperatures and epic scenery, paired with access to services and conveniences seldomly available to cruisers.

And while Sydney itself is an expensive city to live in, that isn’t so much of an issue for those who own a vessel. You can legally stay on most Sydney anchorages for up to 4 days and enjoy multi-million dollar views without the associated price tag. Also, you must not stay more than 30-days in any 12-month period in any single location.

Legalities aside, in this guide, I wanted to show you 17 absolutely stunning anchorages you need to drop into.

1. Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park

You can anchor in Bobbin Head and Appletree Bay which is absolutely stunning year-round! You’ll feel like a million miles away on a sunny day…unless of course, it’s a weekend when the anchorages become absolutely packed out! Still, it’s worth the visit even just for the Instagram likes.

2. Athol Bay

Fancy a visit to Taronga Zoo minus the traffic and parking fees? Well, then you’ll want to anchor in Athol Bay which happens to be one of the most popular Sydney anchorages for cruising yachts, catamarans and powerboats. The wind is minimal here and while you’ll struggle to pick up a mooring ball, you’ll find numerous areas to safely drop an anchor without colliding with another boat, providing you give out enough line.

3. The Spit

If you’re wanting to dock instead of anchor, then drop into The Spit. This is where you’ll find the Middle Harbour Yacht Club whose bistro has some gorgeous views over its small marina and torquise waterways. While berths and mooring balls are hard to secure, you can always anchor out and bring your tender right up on to the sand.

4. Quarantine Bay

There is something eerie about Quarantine Bay as it has a not-so-colourful history as the landing place for many ships in Sydney’s collonial history. Today, however, it’s where you’ll find some great places to anchor your boat without the crowds. You’ll find plenty of sand and swimming potential, paired with some rocky outcrops and if you’re up for it, book yourself in for a ghost tour.

5. Manly Cove

Oh boy! Simply writing this warrants me to get there right now! The vibe of Manly Cove is incredible with so many services such as coffee shops (that’s a necessary service these days, right?) oh so close by. But that’s not all – cafes, grocery stores and even some boutique shopping is only a short stroll from the sand so bring the tender right on up! Just keep an eye out for the Manly ferry which can create quite a bit of a wake during its regular schedule to and from the CBD.

6. Clifton Gardens

If you aren’t so keen to get your boat up into Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park, then Clifton Gardens is the next best option. It’s perfect if you’re looking to beach your vessel on the sand or simply anchor a little out and swim in. On weekends this area gets a little busy so opt for a weekday if you can. Fancy some fish and chips or a shot of coffee? That’s all available just a short stroll from the water’s edge.

7. Sirus Cove

Sirus Cove is the place to go for those who are cruising with pets. It’s one of Sydney’s most popular off-leash dog beaches and it’s quite sheltered for those windy days while also being one heck of a convenient location! Grab the SUP and have a paddle around while you’re here too, because…well, why not?!

8. Chinamans Beach

If you’re up for some upmarket seclusion then you’ll love anchoring at Chinaman’s Beach. Some of the water here is quite deep and worse still, there is a 50-metre exclusion zone from the water’s edge which applies on weekends. After all, it’s a popular swimming spot for families but you’ll still feel a sense of exclusivity right here.

9. Chowder Bay

Definitely one of the most scenic places to anchor and marvel at one of Australia’s greaterest wonders – the giant coat hanger, also known as the Sydney Harbour Bridge. This place is epic for sunrise and sunset photos or, if you’re up for it, snapping some photos of one of the approaching storms. Chowder Bay encompasses Hermit Bay, Athol Bay (mentioned above) as well as Shark Island. For the keen anglers amongst us, you’re in with some luck here!

10. Taylors Bay

Not too many people know about Taylors Bay and its numerous anchorages which are sheltered against the wind. What does that mean for you? A chance to actually score a spot on weekends without rubbing up against other boats who ‘forgot’ their buoys. The beach is small and this place is mostly unremarkable yet a great back-up plan if you can’t get yourself into anywhere else.

11. Watsons Bay

Wouldn’t you just love to experience lunch right there on the beach? If so, then Watson’s Bay is perfect for casual dining or even for take-away. There is a wharf if you’re picking up passengers but you can’t dock here so it’s really ideal if you can either anchor out or bring your boat right up on to the sand. Swimming isn’t as popular (given the risk of shark attacks) but still, it’s a very picture-perfect way to spend a Saturday afternoon.

12. Vaucluse Bay

Fancy spotting some of Sydney’s rich and famous? No doubt you’ll see them basking in the sun at Vaucluse Bay in their mansions right on the water’s edge. This place is not just exclusive but a haven for boaters to congregate from all over Sydney. There is one public mooring but space to anchor too if needed.

13. Balmoral Beach

If you want to swim without the fear of bull sharks taking a nibble, then Balmoral is the place to visit because of its swimming enclosure. Even on weekdays it can get a little busy here given its calm water and large carpark. Fortunately, that’s made up with the numerous shops and eateries dotted along the esplanade.

14. Nielson Park

Almost no one knows that you can anchor a boat in front of Nielson Park and enjoy the beach and walking tracks. If you’re needing some shade then you’ll appreciate the beautiful 100+-year-old trees that line the well-maintained and popular walking tracks here. This is the ultimate spot for a Sunday stroll or just to soak up the sunshine on the beach or on the front sunbaking deck of your boat.

15. Hermit Bay

If you’re looking for a spot to pull up for dinner, then you can’t miss Hermit Bay! There are a couple of courtesy moorings which you can tie up to and admire the beauty of this area, or the gorgeous food being whipped up at one of the various upmarket restaurants. There really is no better place than here!

16. Rose Bay

Rose Bay is one of our favourites here at Cruising Freedom. There are free public moorings available for up to 24 hours paired with numerous safe places to anchor. Better yet, there are some free short-stay berths at the Marina if you’re not able to snap up one of those exlusive mooring balls.

17. Jump Rock

We have left the best Sydney anchorage until last here! You can get to Jump Rock with a quick motor over from either Quanrantine Bay or Manly Cove so it’s perfect if you want to hook into multiple anchorages in one day. Jump Rock isn’t designed for jumping per se but plenty of local teenagers ignore these warnings. Keep an eye out for the larger motor vessels who anchor here due to the deeper anchoarage, as they let out 200ft+ of anchor chain and so they have a wider swing radius.

In Summary

There you have it! Some of Sydney’s best anchorages for boats of any size. Either you want to live on the anchor or take your tender right up on to the beach, you’ll have numerous options to look after your inner craving to be out there instead of the office.

12 Best Sailing Movies To Inspire an Expedition

When life keeps you on dry land, let your mind sail away by watching the best sailing movies. 

Whether it is overcoming massive challenges, dealing with the power struggles of crew members, or learning the meaning of persistence, these sailing movies can grab your attention and make you feel like you are on the water, too. 

So you don’t waste a minute, here is a list of the 12 best sailing movies for your inner expedition. 

1. The Old Man and the Sea (1958)

Based on the classic novel written by Ernest Hemingway, The Old Man and the Sea is an adventure of a solo fisherman. Heading out to sea, old man Santiago catches the biggest fish of his life only to be tormented for days by sharks. By the time he makes it back to safety, he does not have much of his prized catch left to show. 

2. Morning Light (2008)

A documentary about an open-ocean sailing competition, TRANSPAC, and the young sailors that are put to the test. Endurance, perseverance, and teamwork are the skills necessary to succeed at this adventure of a lifetime. Will they sink to the bottom or rise to the top? Watch this crew of fifteen learn to work together and build unbreakable bonds.

3. All is Lost (2013)

This highly acclaimed, Oscar-nominated film starring Robert Redford will keep you on the edge of your seat. As life-threatening challenges appear, including a damaged ship, broken navigation system, and a raging storm, this solo sailor comes face-to-face with his mortality. 

In an attempt to survive, he must return to the basics of sailing and navigating the waters while carefully managing the shrinking supplies necessary for survival. 

4. The Perfect Storm (2000)

Have you ever held your breath while watching an intense movie? From the time you see the clouds roll in, The Perfect Storm will have you struggling to breathe. As a commercial fishing vessel faces turbulent waters and unforgiving waves, the future looks dim. 

A stellar cast featuring George Clooney, Mark Wahlberg, and Diane Lane come together to bring this true story to life. It will have you asking yourself just how much a catch is really worth? 

5. Between Home: Odyssey of an Unusual Sea Bandit (2012)

Do you have dreams of taking a solo voyage? Between Home is a documentary that follows such a voyage from Europe to Australia. Nick Jaffe was a young man who spent four years on a 26ft boat in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans – sailing more than 30,000 nautical miles.

With video footage both on and off the boat, you get an up-close and personal look at the feat. You will feel a sense of relief and pride as Jaffe reaches his destination and fulfils his dream. 

6. Kon-Tiki (2012)

If you are ready for one of the all-time best sailing stories, look no further. Imagine being on a basic raft-like vessel (Kon Tiki, named after an Inca god) facing a seemingly impossible journey from Peru to Tahiti. This journey would take a few months and nearly 4,300 miles. In 1947, this adventure meant solely following the stars and the currents while persevering through to the finish.

This historical drama is based on the real-life expedition of Thor Heyerdahl, a Norwegian scientist who sought to prove that colonization of Polynesia could have been done by American ancestors.

7. White Squall (1996)

Jeff Bridges stars in this true story about the disaster faced by the Albatross ship that met its ill-fate in May of 1961. Full of teenage boys with a thirst for fun, adventure, and knowledge, the ship sets sail and, though there are power struggles, they begin to learn how to become true shipmates. 

Then, the unthinkable happens. The boys are faced with a white squall storm that appeared out of nowhere. Will they have enough training and skill to survive the catastrophic storm?

8. Maiden (2019)

Maiden is a sailing movie to empower young females. Based on the first-ever all-female crew to enter the Whitbread Round the World Race of 1989. The documentary follows the lead character, Tracy Edwards, as she grows from cook to skipper in the competitive arena. Something that was never heard of before. 

9. Captain Ron (1992)

Perhaps the only comedy selection on this list, Captain Ron is a lighthearted, quirky film that will have you laughing to the shore. Having inherited a yacht with little knowledge of sailing, a family hires an odd skipper to help them sail through the Caribbean. Pirates, faulty equipment, accidents, and more plague those onboard in an enjoyable, comedic sense.

10. Maidentrip (2013)

In another empowering female film, sailor Laura Dekker heads out into the blue waters at the age of 14. Her dream? To sail the world. She leaves Holland and heads through the Atlantic and Pacific oceans alone. With much determination and grit, Dekker shows what it means to set a goal and crush it. 

11. Deep Water (2006)

Many documentaries show sailors reaching their dreams. This one, however, shows just how fragile humans are under the power of the ocean. 

Back in 1968, Donald Crowhurst was a businessman who decided to risk it all and compete in the Sunday Times Golden Globe Race. This one person, round-the-world race did not come without challenge – and Crowhurst faced many. 

He chose to keep going despite everything. This is his story. 

12. Adrift (2018)

Love and adventure do not come without struggle. As a young couple sets sail in this film, their survival skills are tested when they confront a strong and deadly hurricane in open water. Adrift is the perfect mix of love, strength, loss, and resilience. 

Wrapping Up

There is a sailing movie out there just waiting for you to watch right now. So when you find yourself spending too much time on dry land, spend time with some of these empowering women, dream catchers, strong men, and more who have all been changed by sailing.